paid search

Bing Ads: Are They Worth the Trouble?

While Google is the most popular search engine on the web, believe it or not, a pretty good amount of people use other search engines as well. One of these is Bing.

If you're advertising your goods or services online using paid search marketing, also known as pay per click (PPC) advertising, then you may want to consider using Bing Ads for some of your efforts. Despite a lower user base, there are enough people using Bing to make it worth your while.

Bing also offers some advantages for advertisers compared to Google.

Below we'll tell you about some of the advantages of advertising with Bing and why it may just be worth the trouble after all.

1. Cheaper and Less Competitive

One of the best things about using Bing Ads is that not many other marketers are. This means that there will be less competition for you and it also means that Bing offers lower costs per click (CPC).

If you're a business that is advertising on a budget, then you'll likely find it much easier to manage your costs with Bing than you would with Google AdWords, which can sometimes be pretty pricey.

2. Higher Conversion Rates

Perhaps because Bing users are less computer savvy, higher conversion rates are common with Bing Ad campaigns as well. Users are more likely to click and convert on Bing Ads than with Google AdWords campaigns. Because of this, if you're serious about trying to optimize your conversion rates, then you may want to consider using Bing instead

This is a big benefit because even though there may not be as much traffic overall with Bing, the traffic that does see your ad will be more likely to convert or become a customer in the end.

3. Better Targeting Features

While Google AdWords does have quite a bit of targeting features and options for optimizing and tweaking campaigns there are places where Google could improve. Luckily, Bing picks up the slack exactly where many of the Google AdWords issues are.

For example, with Bing, you'll have much more control at both the campaign level and at the ad group level. You'll be able to target location, scheduling, language and network settings in both areas.

Additionally, with Bing, you'll also have more extensive options for choosing what devices to target and what search demographics you want your ads to be shown to. 

4. More Search Partner Control

With Bing, you'll also have more control over search partner settings. While Google gives you the option to show ads on search engine results pages (SERPs) only or on SERPS and search partners, Bing offers you the option to choose one or the other, or both.

This can be a huge plus for businesses who find that their ads fare well on search partner pages but not so well in search engine results.

5. A New Traffic Source

Another reason you may want to consider using Bing Ads in addition to Google AdWords is simply that it opens up new options for who you can target with your advertising campaigns.

Typically, the average internet user chooses a search engine and sticks with it. This means that if you've been running your ads on Google for a long time, many people will have likely seen your ad multiple times before. If you want to reach completely fresh faces, using Bing is a great way to do it since the audiences will overlap very little.

Deciding If Bing Ads Are Right For Your Business

While many businesses will want to use Google AdWords, there are cases where Bing Ads can make a good choice as well, particularly when used in conjunction with Google ads.

You'll want to consider the advantages listed above carefully when deciding if Bing is right for you. Make sure you do some testing and experimenting with both ad networks before you make the final call.

Looking for help with your eCommerce marketing strategy? Contact us today to learn more about what we can do for you.

Top 3 Myths Expelled: Just Because Someone Works For Google Doesn't Mean They're A Google Ads Expert

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Let me start off by saying this blog article by no means is to bash Google reps. In many cases, we work with them on a weekly basis with our clients on specific questions. It's intended primarily to warn clients of the potential downsides to listening to everything an account representative from Google tells them. It's also intended to help us Google Ads managers out there that have had clients do one of the following:

1. Forward an email to them from Google stating something along the lines of "Google recommends we make this change, can you please implement it?"

2. The client has a call with Google outside of the Google ads manager's knowledge in which one of two things happens. One, the client approves Google making a recommended change. Two, the client implements it themselves. Days, weeks, or sometimes months later we discover the change and the negative effects that it had.

3. A Google Ads dedicated account rep threatening the account manager or the client that if they don't make a certain change, they will lose the dedicated support (yes this has happened to me)

4. Lose a client because Google has offered to build and manage their Google ads account for free while I'm charging a management fee (yes this has happened to me multiple times)

If you manage Google Ads accounts for other companies, if you haven't had any of those happen yet, don't worry you will soon enough. I completely understand the challenge this poses to our companies that advertise on Google.

For a potentially new or early stage client, they don't have a "trust" factor established yet. For a long-term client they do, but unless they have already experienced losing performance and money to a change Google made or recommended, who are they to question the very people that built the search engine on how to best advertise on their search engine?

That all seems to make sense, but unfortunately it is not the case. Let me dispel a few myths about your average Google account representative (they change their titles so much I'm not sure what they are called now).

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Myth 1: They work for Google, so they have access to information about the Google ads platform that the public doesn't

Truth: Google holds any secret information about their algorithm from the vast majority of their company, especially anyone that works directly with clients. If anything I've found that the public find out about platform changes before many of the Google ads account reps because we're actively seeking and following. I can guarantee if your paid search manager is keeping up with the latest releases and trends they know at least the same amounts as a Google ads account rep about the advertising platform.

Myth 2: Google ads representatives know and understand the Google ads platform and algorithm better than anyone because they work with it every day.

Truth: Most Google ads representatives, unless you are an account spending high 6-7 figures per month have less than 1-year experience with the platform. Of the dozens if not hundreds of Google Ads account reps I've worked with over the years, I've never come across a single one that not only ever managed a Google ads account on their own, but had any sort of marketing role prior to working at Google. Typically they have a sales background because that's technically what they are considered within Google.

Myth 3: Google Ads reps and Google Ads agencies have the same goal for their clients, long-term success and spending money.

Truth: This one I have some challenges with because theoretically, it should be true. Account managers or agencies need our clients to increase their spending on Google ads and be successful in order to continue working with us. It's in our best interest to optimize the account towards their ROAS or CPA goals. That is true. One would think Google would have the same intention, but time and time again all I've ever seen them caring about is spending more money on the platform regardless of what the conversion results are. In fact, there are many businesses that stopped advertising on Google and never will again because of the experience they had losing money, but because it was set up by Google Ads reps.

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Where is my evidence to back all of this up?

I've been managing Google Ads/Adwords clients for more than 12 years. I have fought this battle with Google and clients for that entire time. I've taken over clients where I cringe even to tell them the amount of money they lost because of what Google reps did to their account. I've lost clients for refusing to make changes Google recommended. Don't get me wrong, there are many terrible private paid search managers out there. In fact, I would argue less than 10% of us are actually really good at what we do, but that's another blog post.

Just last week I took over an account that had 4 campaigns set up by Google and run for 6 months. Three search only campaigns were all broad match keywords and one what was supposed to be "remarketing" audience was targeting a irrelevant in-market audience. Not one search term over a six month period because of the broad match setup was right for his business. Great, he didn't pay anything for a management fee. Unfortunately, he lost $10,000 over the time period.

Not everything they tell you will be wrong. I'm not here to say that. I just want perspectives to change when Google does recommend something. Maybe get a second opinion? At the very least be open to your pay per click manager not implementing a suggested change if they have a good reason not to. A good reason isn't "everything Google tells you to will waste money." If they tell you that you probably should find a new pay per click manager or agency.

A good reason would be something like:

"We prefer to rotate our ads evenly and decide on our own which is the best performer. There are many factors we use to determine the success of an ad, and while Google has improved their automated functionality for ad copy optimization, we often test this and believe our method works better."

I hope there are Google advertisers that read this and I save their PPC Manager and agency from having to argue this or even worse, give in and watch their client's results suffer. After all, would you let the IRS do your taxes?

If you have any questions about this don’t hesitate to message us. Just click on the Facebook messenger icon and we’ll respond. If you need a second opinion on a recommended change we will be happy to help. Most importantly, if Google setup your campaigns or is managing your account, please let us audit it.