Messenger For eCommerce: The One Reason You Should Forget About Every Other Chat Provider

Messenger bots for e-commerce are nothing new.  I get it.  If you search "messenger bots for e-commerce" on Google, you get 1.98 million results.

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If we all know about them by now, why are most eCommerce websites only scratching the surface of their potential?  That is if they are even using a messenger bot.


Let's check the top 5 e-commerce sites right now (I'll skip Amazon).  I'm going to go with mobile too.  
 

Walmart.com

Newly redesigned website, first time I'm actually seeing this.  Found a nearly hidden live chat box.  Oh, nevermind clicked into it, and they only want to know if I liked their website.  Gave them a 5 thinking a chatbot might open up, but they continue to ask me about the website.
 

Homedepot.com

They've got a little live chat box on all pages I found, although it seems to open up late.  First question: name.  No problem.  Second question: email.  I'm out.  (We'll come back to this later)
 

Bestbuy.com

3 minutes in looking at category pages, product pages, even adding a product to my cart.  No live chat anywhere.  I was looking for a recommendation on a Samsung or Sony TV.  I'm out.
 

Target.com

Same as BestBuy.com.  No live chat anywhere.
 

Costco.com

Nothing here either.

The number 2, 4, 5, and 6 eCommerce websites in the United States don't have live chat functionality (that I can find).  There has been article after article and test after test of the importance of chatbots increasing eCommerce sales for at least the past 1-2 years, but it seems that most of the top eCommerce websites in the country haven't even implemented this yet.
This could be a significant opportunity for smaller e-commerce companies to have an advantage over the big guys.


While there's a lot of opportunities to leverage Facebook messager for e-commerce websites within Facebook, what is more often neglected is leveraging Facebook messenger directly on your website.  This newer feature is rarely found on any website. 

That brings us to the question I'm here to answer: why integrate Facebook messenger on your website over any of the other dozens of live chat platforms on the market?  One reason.  As soon as a potential customer engages with your company on Facebook messenger, whether it's within Facebook or on your website, you can message them from that point on.  You can't do this with any other chat platform on the market.  This is a huge opportunity to take advantage of.


Back to the Home Depot example.  I couldn't even ask a question without entering my email.  I'm not ready to make that kind of commitment to them, but I completely understand why they believe the should ask and their data likely proves it as well.  Home Depot wants to have the ability to contact the individual after the conversation.  If that were done through Facebook messenger though, they would have access to message me anytime they wanted, without ever asking me for my email address.  Pretty amazing right?  Imagine the number of potential customers that drop off because they require an email address.

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Are we all familiar with email open rates right?  At 20% we're jumping for joy.  Say out of 100 people Home Depot loses 50% on live chat because they don't want to enter their email address (it's likely much higher).  Of the 50 that entered their email address at best 20% open, the email Home Depot sent.  That's 10 out of 100.  If they were running Facebook messenger, they would have a 0% drop off because they wouldn't need to ask for their email address.  So out of 100, they chat with all 100.  After the chat session, they message all 100 people.  Facebook messenger open rate is over 80%.  


With the current method, Home Depot is using they get 10 out of 100 people to open the follow-up email.  If they switched to using Facebook messenger that number would increase to 80!  That's an 800% increase.

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What are you all waiting for?  Often the mindset of small e-commerce companies is how we can compete with the big guys?  Here is a golden opportunity.


Now that I've shown you why you should implement Facebook messenger within our e-commerce website, what are the practical use cases?  Here are three I'll go over.


Engage with a potential customer early on in their sales cycle.  

This is where you have the opportunity to replace the customer service of a brick and mortar store.  While this has the most opportunity with a more consultative sale, like a TV or a washer & dryer, it can still work with clothing and any other item as well.  A great example would be a couple of months back I was in the marketing for a new washer & dryer.  I spent some time doing my research online, but I hit a wall where there was too much information out there for me to decipher and I didn't have the time to spend on it.  In the end, I was forced to go into a brick and mortar location to consult with an expert.  I wanted to make this entire purchase online, but I was missing the sales support I truly needed online and knew I could get in a store.  There are some e-commerce sites out there doing an outstanding job of this, like Crutchfield, but too many fall short.  Again an excellent opportunity for smaller up and coming companies to take the lead.

Closing The Deal

After you engaged with the visitor on your website to help consult them through the sale, if they leave unexpectedly or abandon their cart, you then have the opportunity to reach back out and close the deal.  This could be anything from offering a discount to answering any further questions they may have.  With less than 2% of visitors on average making a purchase the first time they visit your site, this is a perfect opportunity to increase that number.

After Sales Support

There was a study done where at least 80% of customers responded to order notifications on Facebook messenger whereas very few replied to an email.  What if your customers have questions after they receive their purchase?  This is where you get an opportunity to get them into your messenger list when you don't have them.  If you direct them to ask their questions using messenger, now you have that option to contact them in the future.  HP has a fully automated bot that walks customers through setting up a printer until they can print their first document.  Not only does it increase your customer satisfaction, but it also gets your customers onto your messenger list to reach out in the future.


Now there are indeed cases where a fully automated bot won't be enough.  For instance, on the consultative sale, you will likely get to a point where you need human interaction, but you can at least get through initial questions to judge the quality of the visitor and timing to have a human interject in the messenger.  The way we set these up variest by client.  Some we have only one or two questions and answers before a human interjects while others we have it set up to have a full conversation lasting up to 15 minutes.  You might find there are a lot of common issues that can be automated with a bot that will significantly cut down on the real human intervention.  In the beginning, as your learning, you will need more human interaction, but as you learn common questions and solutions, you can begin to automate more and more and cut down on the level of human support needed.  In the end this will incurease customer satisfaction, sales and reduce human interaction needed in customer service.

Chat with us on our Facebook messenger bot if you have any questions on implementing this feature.  We would love to help and show examples on successful implementations.

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